Reading Skills

The First Steps In Reading For Homeschoolers

The child who is a non-reader may be age 3, 5, 7, or even 10. My husband, at the age of 10 in 1957, could barely read. Why? Because he had been taught by the “see and say” method of reading.

Teaching the Non-Reader to Read

By Ann Bowers

The child who is a non-reader may be age 3, 5, 7, or even 10. My husband, at the age of 10 in 1957, could barely read. Why? Because he had been taught by the “see and say” method of reading. Children were given little readers, told the words, and expected to remember them, without any means of “cracking the code.” After learning about 100-200 words, the children would get confused by words that looked alike (they and them, for instance) and their reading progress stopped. In 5th grade, my husband’s teacher, Mrs. Wasciepinez, (whom he remembers to this day) taught her students phonics and they learned to read. Today, John is a university graduate and software engineer. 
Three Things To Do To Teach Your Child To Read 
To teach your child to read, you must do three things:
  1. Read to the child every day from the time he is 8 months old. (However, it’s never too late to start.)
  2. Teach the child the letters and sounds of the English language and their relationship to reading.
  3. Teach the child to comprehend what is read. 

When you read to your child, choose anything he/she enjoys. Have the child sit so that he/she can see the words and pictures. Use a marker under the words as you read.  

Talk with your child about the story and the pictures. Ask questions of him/her and explain parts of the story he/she doesn’t understand. (Comprehension) 
Teach the letters and sounds of English and their relationship to reading. This starts at age 3 when the child is following along as you read. Many children will learn “phonics” (i.e.; the letters and sounds and their relationship) just by doing this for several years. As you read, point to various words and say things like, “This word is apple. What sound does apple start with?”   “This word is dog. What sound does dog end with?”   “This word is hat. What sound does hat have in the middle?” “This word is the. It’s hard to sound out. Let’s memorize it. Let’s spell it together. T,h,e” 
As soon as your child learns to print, he/she can print some of the words and say the sounds. Give the child some magnetic letters to use on a cookie sheet. Help the child spell words with the letters, sounding them out. Have your child watch Sesame Street at least three times a week to learn letters, sounds, and numbers. There are also excellent computer games which are fun and teach these skills. 
Soon, your child will know some words. Create word cards for him/her to show off their reading skills for relatives and friends. Teach the child to recognize and print his name at age 4 or 5. Label things in his room at age 3, such as bed, dresser, mirror, lamp, etc. Use standard printing to do this. Play games that teach letter names and sounds, such as Concentration, Rummy (with letter cards instead of regular cards). Cut pictures out of magazines and help your child make the words, using the magnetic letters. 
By kindergarten age (5-6), your child should know all the letter names and sounds and how to blend sounds together. He/she should have a reading vocabulary of at least 30 words, including: the, boy, girl, see, has, a, to, ran, run, has, cat, dog, mom, dad, go, have, car, house, bed, I, you, we, for, home, school, play, laugh, sad, happy, with, me, said.
Here are the sounds needed by the non-reader to read in English: 
Vowels and some Vowel Digraphs
Aa
apple
Aa
gave
ay
say
Ee       end                   ee        seem                    ea
team

Ee
eagle 

Ii          in                      Ii          ice                
ie

tie

Oo
octopus
Oo
hope
Uu
up
Uu
tune
ue
Blue
Yy
yes
Yy
my
Yy
baby
Consonants

   
Bb
bed
Cc
cat
Cc
Circle
Dd
Dog 
Ff
fair
Gg
girl
Gg
giraffe
Hh
house
Jj
jam
Kk
Kitten
Ll
Love
Mm
Mom
Nn

nine

Pp
pig
Qq
quart
Rr
red
Ss
salad
Tt
ten
Vv
violet
Ww
wagon
Xx
six
Zz
zebra
   
R-Controlled vowels    
ar
card
er
dinner
or
for
ur
fur
ir
girl
 
Consonant Digraphs    
th
them, the
sh
she, shoe
wh
white, when
ch

child, chin

qu
quart, quail
ph
photo
kn
knife
ng
song
 
Dipthongs    
nk
sink
lt
belt
nd
bend
oo
wood
oo
too
aw
awning, saw
ew
new, dew
ow
plow, cow
ou

ground

oi

coin

oy
boy
au
auto

A great site for phonics and sight word worksheets and instructional units is:
www.edhelper.com.
From the BBC, check out:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/wordsandpictures/phonics/index.shtml.
To find a copy of the Dolch 220 Most Frequently Used English Words go to:
http://english-zone.com/
Bio for Ann Bowers
Ann Bowers has been an elementary school teacher, in kindergarten through 8th grade, for 20 years. She was a Bilingual Education Grant Project Coordinator for seven years and a school principal for seven. She has a B.A. in English, an M.A. in Education, and holds California Life Teaching Credentials and specialist credentials in Remedial Reading and Teaching English as a Second Language. She is retired and has started a second career as a freelance writer.

No part of this article may be copied or reproduced in any form without the express permission of More4Kids Inc © 2006

  

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